Be Like Kevin

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Call. And call again. Take the calls—even when you’re driving to dinner with your girlfriend and looking for a parking space. Take the call, especially if it’s your dad. Not because he’s 85, because he’s your dad.

Connect with people. Laugh. Let your funny be infectious. Don’t be a hater. Speak your mind. Apologize when you screw up. And mean it. Move on.

OWN your anger. Be forthright, but be gracious. Love women. Really love them. And music. Listen to music-LOUD! Especially the 80s. Hard rock. KISS.

But take Etta James and the candles. Yeah, bring that old boom box to the beach. Play the game Washers.

Read. The Bible when you feel nudged. Take pleasure in reading. Find your guy. Kevin’s was Lee Child, but he also read Mark Twain, JR Moehringer and Alice Lundy.

Give people nicknames. ICE! ICE! ICE! Let it be your way of honoring them.

Pray. Out loud. In the morning. While drinking coffee and watching birds with your girlfriend.

Say, “I LOVE THAT!” often. Say, “I love you.” Write it. Write letters. Send Valentine’s Day cards with love to everyone.

Enjoy good food. Make memories, like taking your gal to Tony’s, where you used to go with your mom. But, also go to dive bars. Bring home Taco Bell sauce packets that say “Marry Me” and present them like a bouquet of flowers.

Seek love. Be romantic. Be real.

Follow your passions and applaud others. Take care of your business, but don’t be so serious. Make work fun. When it’s not, refocus. Readjust. Decide what you want and go for it.

Change. If you want to. Become better.

Be at peace with yourself. Take care of yourself. LOVE YOURSELF. And especially, BE YOURSELF. Kevin was totally himself, not imitating a soul.

Be emotionally courageous. Say: This is how I am. I have a temper and I can be selfish, but I’m the man for you. Yeah, be a man—in the best sense of the word.

Support your team and Diva’s team and your people. Show up. Be on time. And have some style!

LIVE your life. If it ever comes to your door, kick cancer’s ass!

Speak a different language with your brothers—one your girlfriend couldn’t understand if she wanted to. Make your cousin a brother and make the word BROTHER mean something. Make friendship and family mean something.

GO ALL IN. Whatever you’re doing: sex, drugs, rock-n-roll, sales, wooing a woman, loving your mom, hanging with friends, frying fish, developing relationships, telling a truth, listening,… damn, Kevin could listen.

I know he could talk, but he could really listen.

Open doors. Pull out chairs. Hug. Hold your partner tight through the entire night. Kiss too hard and love like this is your last chance and you want to get it right.

Buy little gifts. Don’t expect so much from others. Give because it makes you feel good.

Tell stories. And make them good!

Hang with your boys. Be wild when you’re young, but never grow old. Get out of the house, but spend time hanging at home, just chillin’.

Be like a kid. But be a man. Face life head on.

Be like Kevin, but you can’t. There was only one. So, be like you—the one Kevin loves. Still.

 

 

How to Risk Again.

How to Risk Again.

“Like a magnet, you will draw new and exciting events and people because like attracts like.” ~ Chin-Ning Chu, Thick Face Black Heart

If you could get back all you lost and love—

The places where you stand on solid ground, expanded.

Sacred love. Diving into your calling. Living in the spiritual gulf stream.

Divine laughter. Nourishing lovemaking. Enough money not to worry.

Faith to progress forward in the face of hard things.

Energy to persist. A heart willing.

Would you go all in, all over again, if it meant

Risking losing your mind and desire to live,

If you lose, all over again?

Yes, 2020. ALL IN.

 

Dance Partner 2020

Soul seeks something divine.

Ego seeks everything. She’s a squirrel scrambling on life’s limb.

Soul sings and dances when I write, pray, meditate, walk in the woods, or look into baby Mia’s eyes and catch a glimpse of God.

Soul stretches in feminine containers and communities. She likes to hold hands and skip. She digs writers, artists, musicians, and sexy men.

When I dance and swing my hips, Soul and Ego kiss.

When I get grounded and attune with my angels and guides, I’m free.

But, this human American life costs money, as Ego likes to remind me. She’s not wrong.

And yet, I’ve been held by Grace’s hands of abundance and reminded what’s important.

“What’s that?” Ego Asks, “Did you say you volunteered to go broke? You don’t like money? You just want to sit around and meditate? Maybe learn to paint?”

Soul smiles. She always smiles.

“Oh Ego, I know you’re dying to get out and prove yourself worthy to this world. You’d go out—to the bar, the store, the sales job, anything to avoid Insecurity or Loneliness.”

Soul soothes, “It’s ok, honey. Come, sit with me. Together, we’ll smooth this out. Let me tell you a secret, Ego: I love you. You and I have a divine destiny.”

Going within is falling in love with Self, all her facets of brilliance, and imperfections of personality.

Soul continues, “Going within—and working on and toward our Big Dream is our courtship. So many dates to meditate, write, pray, practice Reiki and Kundalini, weave a history, the path we’ve walked through the forest of life. Thank you for joining me on this journey. Ego, I know you want to run. You resist my touch. It’s ok, baby. I know you’re scared.

Another year is ending, and you fear you haven’t done enough, been enough, or made enough progress. Sweetheart, come here. Come here. Come IN. Let Soul rock you.”

“See, Grace comes to turn the page on another year to give you a fresh perspective. You get to choose again. Do you want to come inside with me? Your friends are here.

Truth never looked so dazzling, like Lady Liberty covered in stars. And Destiny, she’s a queen, like Diana and Elizabeth. When you go in, you’ll find a thousand queens rising. Peace, she’s inside, too—lighting a fire and serving teas from faraway lands.

But Ego, you want to go outside to meet a man, or make some cash, or get drunk on distraction. You want to be entertained!

Trust me, Ego. Come inside. Let Love of Everything seduce you.

Where do you want to be? Noise and Chaos await you on the corner with their friends Judgement and Remorse. You can go out if you want.”

“Will you be sad?” Ego asks.

“It doesn’t matter if we go within or go without. We’ll be together. It’s just that when you go too fast and chase everything, I get quiet and you don’t hear me.”

“You’re right,” Ego says, “Sometimes I need the noise. I’m seduced by the drama. But listening to you, being with you, feels right. I’d like to come inside tonight.”

Soul smiles. She always smiles.

“Yes,” she says, “Let’s face the morning together, naked, happy and hungry to taste the new year.”

Cheers! May you find yourself dancing with possibility in 2020.

Facing the Fact.

What’s lurks, as I lean into life?

I’ve cleared my vision,

Shifted into my old optimism,

Dove back in for another revision.

I went running—pain free—three times.

I went on a date—without talking about my deceased beloved.

I readied to claim my progress.

But, like a bully who knows me too well,

Grief casts her shadow.

Still.

I know what I don’t want to know.

Worse than the fact:

He’s never coming back

(which I still—three years, nine months in—don’t quite believe),

I never stop wishing

He was here

Making it easy

To lean into

My life

Without him.

How I Lean into the Goneness.

“Dogs are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole.” ~ Roger Caras

I washed my yoga mat, which I rarely did while my 100-lb Black Lab Phoenix filled my life. Before she died months ago, she determined the rolling out of my mat was meant for her, even if I tried to coax her onto her own yoga mat, gifted due to her nail scratches. She had to be on whichever mat I wanted to use. So, I mostly did yoga around her.

My clean pink yoga mat free of black hair on the kitchen floor invited me into the emptiness, the sucker punch of her goneness.

 I sat with my sadness. I miss you so much, baby!

It used to be when I was sad Phoenix and I went for walks around the neighborhood and into the woods.

I still go sometimes—to get my body moving and commune with the trees.

The neighbors with dogs hardly recognize me without her black body by my side.

She served as my guide dog, guiding me to people. She could smell who needed love.

She traipsed across lawns like an eight-year-old girl, interrupted conversations, leaned in for love, and accepted certain treats from favored folks.

Kids asked to pet her. Does she bite? Will she lick me? She likes me!

She taught kids who feared dogs they didn’t need to be afraid. She helped teenage boys push past their cool and allow affection.

She let a neighbor grieving her own dog hug tight through sobs and suddenly dismiss.

The landlord, who doesn’t even melt for spotted baby deer, bragged to the window guy about Phoenix. “She wasn’t just a dog!” She was a presence.

When she stayed with my friends Carol and Pete and I was on my way to pick her up, they said, “We don’t know any Phoenix; Our dog’s name is Princess!”

That’s what one neighbor called her. She’d disappear behind, or maybe in, his house. Sometimes I feared he coveted her in a way that made me understand that commandment. I insisted he stop calling her Princess. “Her name is Phoenix!”

But yes, there was something regal about her. When neighbors engaged with her, as they often did, their invisible walls dropped. She made people feel safe.

When they exclaimed, “She’s so beautiful!” they meant her entire demeanor, as well as her black satin coat. Her soft caramel eyes whispered caresses. Her untainted, soulful authenticity invited comfort. She knew how to walk the path to love.

Now, I walk alone. I feel invisible and vulnerable without my identity born from “This is Phoenix’s mom!” The easy connections and conversations sever without her.

Then, there’s the lovely older couple… The lady flat out told me early on when I invited her to a gathering, “The only people I like in this neighborhood is Phoenix.”

For years, both husband and wife, asked repeatedly, “Has she gained weight? She looks heavy.” I stifled my instinctive, “Have you?”

Now that she’s gone, I’m privy to a new conversation. Recently, they pulled their van close to me, against the nonexistent weekday suburbia traffic.

“Gosh, we hardly recognized you without Phoenix! We don’t see you walking much. How old was she?”

“Eleven.”

They didn’t seem to have a reference point. They shrugged and looked at each other. “What did she die from?”

“I don’t know. She’d been sick for a while.”

“Was it cancer?”

“Probably.”

This conversation served up the opposite of “two heads are better than one,” as I’ve had the exact conversation with each of them individually.

“Well, we don’t see you walking as much without her.” Do you wonder why?

I can’t be too irritated with this couple, though. When Phoenix and I moved into the neighborhood, they told me where to catch the trail into the woods, like slipping me a secret ticket to childlike freedom found in the forest, our playground where Phoenix could go off leash while I walked, ran, skipped, sung, or wrote.

The trees swaying in spring, autumn colors splashing against the river mirror, the fluffy, winter carpet encouraging us to forge a fresh path, and the swept-clean dirt floor dancing with roots repeatedly returned us to our better natures.

I go alone now, seeking my spirit, missing my Lab partner, and feeling vulnerable without her bark, bold body, and announcement to anyone we might meet among the trees: I’m with her.

She’s not with me now. As a woman, I’m suddenly a little less free. I must stay more aware, the way a wise woman walks in the world today.

I’m acutely aware of my 11-year-old loyalist’s absence, along with her lingering love.

My yoga mat is clean. I practice into this new space where I don’t have to navigate a dog for whom I’d gladly lay out a mat, a bed, or a bowl every day of my life.

She was my pleasure, my treasure, and my protector. A gift of the highest order.

How Memory Soothes.

“The most evident token and an apparent sign of wisdom is a constant and unrestrained rejoicing.” ~ Michel de Monatigne

The Cardinals’ chirps announce their return

to feeders outside sliding glass doors.

Fresh October air kisses my face

with memories I want to

dive into and dismiss:

The October my Labrador Phoenix and

I stayed with my boyfriend Kevin

at his house in the country

with a view of the river and

trees thick like an autumn rainbow.

Mornings sat us at his new, suited-for-two round table

With coffee made for and served to each other.

Kevin crossed his long basketball-star legs and

Pointed out birds I never noticed.

He knew their names and identifying characteristics.

In those moments, we were an old couple together.

I could grow old with this man, my mate.

We were Fire & Ice; Crazy, Sexy, Cool.

We added a thousand memories

After our colorful fall that felt like

I’d finally found a home for my soul.

March of 2016 took my beloved

like a kidnapper in the night,

by complete surprise.

His heart stopped

in the center of our love story,

that began with

two decades

invested in telling tales

About men and women we dated, married and divorced.

About jobs we worked since the one where we met,

Stories told over miles he and I drove separately.

So often we spoke for hours with one of us on the road.

He ran sales appointments and I drove between MN and OH

To see my sister, whose husband was dying of cancer.

How did I forget that Kevin carried me through those conversations

where my heart was breaking for my sister and brother-in-law and nephews?

Kevin encouraged me to stay with my sister after her husband—and then the cat—died.

And besides, the guy I lived with strutted the pilot stereotype he denied.

Kevin said, “Icey, you’ve got to get out of there.”

Always direct with each other: the kind of friendship I value.

Direct and the freedom to disagree. Respect and acceptance

Built a foundation for our deeper-than-either-of-us-had-ever-been intimacy.

We’d each tried to create a sacred, harmonious relationship with others,

But never got it right. Until we did.

Kevin and I knew what we had the way children know to play in water.

The same way Cardinals know when the feeder is full

And my heart knows it’s fall, when crisp air,

Color, fog, birds and memories collide.  

And I smile.

Letter to my Beloved, a Year and a Half after his Death.

Three and a half years after Kevin’s death, I think less, “Damn! I lost that!” I think more, “Wow! I had that!” Crazy, sexy, cool.

Alice in Authorland

“When good men die their goodness does not perish, but lives on though they are gone.” ~ Euripides

Dear Kevin,

Thank you. Thank you for embodying your authentic self and welcoming me to be the Alice Lundy you saw—not just my best self, but the real me: raw, vulnerable, smart, beautiful, jealous, funny, a writer worth reading, sexy, determined, feisty, intuitive, angry, weird, stubborn, free-spirited, and a terrible singer, but a great story-teller.

You saw me. You got me. All of me—the parts I wanted to deny, abandon, or project onto others, and especially the qualities about myself I believe on my best days.

You knew who I was back when the only thing I cared more about than selling books was the truth, and I assumed it was clear and simple.

So, I held truth against you for 20 years and you let me without pitting alternatives against me…

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